April 11, 2018

Goalie superstar

Carey Price: How a First Nations Kid Became a Superstar GoaltenderCarey Price: How a First Nations Kid Became a Superstar Goaltender 
by Catherine Rondina

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

A brief, yet thorough biography that emphasizes not only Price's success as a goaltender, but his success off the ice as well. The book's clarity and length are ideal for young readers, as is its trim size - it actually feels good to hold. With just the right amount of interesting facts and stats, this book is appealing for all sports fans.





March 21, 2018

Words of wisdom

One Last Word: Wisdom from the Harlem RenaissanceOne Last Word: Wisdom from the Harlem Renaissance 
by Nikki Grimes

My rating : 5 of 5 stars


Nikki Grimes is simply a wonderful poet. Highly highly recommended. Here's why:


From the first line of Calling Dreams by Georgia Douglas Johnson, Grimes has crafted the following gem:

The Sculptor

No accident of birth or race or place determines the
scope of hope or dreams I have a right
to. I inventory my head and heart to
weigh and measure what talents I might use to make
my own tomorrow. It all depends on the grit at my
disposal. My father says hard work is the clay dreams
are molded from. Yes. Molded. Dreams do not come.
They are carved, muscled into something solid, something true.




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February 26, 2018

The 57 Bus

The 57 Bus: A True Story of Two Teenagers and the Crime That Changed Their LivesThe 57 Bus: A True Story of Two Teenagers and the Crime That Changed Their Lives 
by Dashka Slater

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This is an important book. A true story, it will leave you questioning the youth criminal justice system, children's rights, gender identity, racism, and inequality. A journalist, Slater writes clearly and distinctly, with empathy and compassion towards both sides. 

Highly recommended.



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October 11, 2017

The right to an education

Fight to Learn: The Struggle to Go to SchoolFight to Learn: The Struggle to Go to School 
by Laura Scandiffio

My rating: 5 of 5 stars


Children and teens battle poverty, discrimination, violence, and inequality in order to go to school. An inspiring call to action.



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October 4, 2017

The decline of a big bird

The Tragic Tale of the Great AukThe Tragic Tale of the Great Auk
by Jan Thornhill

My rating: 5 of 5 stars


Very well-told.



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September 20, 2017

Great Spirit does a thing

Minegoo Mniku: the Mi'kmaq Creation Story of Prince Edward Island
retold and illustrated by Sandra L. Dodge
(Acorn Press)


After the Great Spirit creates the world and its people, he also creates Minegoo - a beautiful island on which his people will live. He tells his helper, Kluskap, to place the island on the most beautiful place on earth. Kluskap sets Minegoo on the Shining Waters, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

A magical creation story, delicately told in both Mi'kmaq and English. Fine, lightly tinted watercolours enhance the tale, as do the Mi'kmaq quill patterns that edge each page.



My rating: 4 of 5 stars


my read shelf:
Mary-Esther Lee's book recommendations, liked quotes, book clubs, book trivia, book lists (read shelf)








Another interesting creation story; this is from the Yerubas:


The Origin of Life on Earth: An African Creation Myth
retold by David A. Anderson


Olorun, the supreme god, told his orishas (assistants) that the entire sky was theirs to explore. But Obatala wanted to do more. He suggested that if something could be built on the waters below, a world of beings could be created. Then the orishas could use their powers to help them. Olorun agreed and told Obatala to create the earth and its people.  




September 14, 2017

Not Your Princess

#Notyourprincess: Voices of Native American Women#NotYourPrincess: Voices of Native American Women 
by Lisa Charleyboy


My rating: 5 of 5 stars


With stories, poetry, and art, Indigenous women give voice to their anger and resilience in the face of prejudice and stereotypes. Highly recommended.





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